The Process of Applying For Prosthetics and Orthotics

A Prosthodist and Orthodontist, defined by The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Technologies (ICD-T) is a health care professional having overall a the upper extremity prosthetics or the lower extremity prosthetics. Upper extremity prosthetics include braces, crutches, and other similar items to help a person regain his or her strength and function. Lower extremity prosthetics on the other hand include walking aids, cane holders, and so on. There are also artificial hips and knees available for those who suffer from hip arthritis. the face, jaw and hands for individuals from different walks of life, including children. The prosthetics company in Philadelphia also treats patients with disorders that involve the musculoskeletal system.

In order to provide complete prosthetics and orthotics to patients, the prosthesis is created keeping in mind the natural function of that body part. This includes the functionality of the eye, hand, foot, spine, neck and facial structures, thus making sure that all these parts are properly compensated for. The prosthetic device is then attached or fixed on the patient's natural anatomical structure. However, it is important to choose the right prosthetic accordingly to the body structure, considering factors such as the natural curvature of the bone structure of the patient. Additionally, the exact anatomic location of the body part involved should be considered for proper fitting of the prosthetic.

Today, the field of prosthetics and orthotics has come a long way with regards to providing a better quality of life to patients suffering from severe conditions, such as amputations, birth defects, diseases affecting the muscles, joints and ligaments. In addition to this, more patients today are opting for non-surgical treatments like physical therapy and body movement. However, in cases where the only option left for them is to have their limbs amputated, a great deal of concern and effort needs to be put into choosing the correct prosthesis. The most common type of prosthesis used to replace the lost limb is the artificial limb.

A very important thing to remember when looking for a prosthetic is to consider its suitability for use in the specific case. Typically, prosthetics and orthotics have two types; those that can be attached to the body naturally and those that need to be attached externally. Attaching prosthetics and orthotics to the body naturally is called anatomy. However, when it comes to attaching the prosthesis to the bones externally or adhering or cementing them on the external side of the body, the type of prosthesis to be used is known as interosseous. When it comes to curing the condition through the means of the artificial methods, it is known as exosseous. Thus, before undergoing an operation or treatment using any kind of prosthesis, it is very important to know more about the type of orthosis needed for the treatment.

Generally, there are two types of prosthetic devices that can be used to treat conditions such as loss of motion, or weakness in the limbs. These  bionics companies Philadelphia avails the upper extremity prosthetics or the lower extremity prosthetics. Upper extremity prosthetics include braces, crutches, and other similar items to help a person regain his or her strength and function. Lower extremity prosthetics on the other hand include walking aids, cane holders, and so on. There are also artificial hips and knees available for those who suffer from hip arthritis.

After consulting with the prosthetists, it is then time to look up the relevant government regulations for using prosthetics and orthotics. Usually, the health service provider will give detailed instructions about the procedure and entry requirements. However, a patient may still be asked to go through the detailed instructions given by the NHS, or local health authorities depending on where he or she is located. This is usually done as a safety measure. Check out this post for more details related to this article: 

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